Snickerdoodles

 

While most of the requests for cookies in our family are for Chocolate Chip, Joe talks about 2 favorite cookies – Molasses and Snickerdoodles. I don’t think I have ever made Molasses cookies that taste as good as he remember the ones his Aunt Sally made, and I have not made Snickerdoodles in a long time. Recently I decided I needed to make his favorites more often. But to be honest, the ones in this pictures were destined to send to church for the VBS kids last week. I saved enough for him though! Recipes are everywhere for this old-fashioned cookie with a strange name. My Treasures from the Bend cookbook published  by the Ford Bend Junior Service League includes a comment about the history of the cookie.

(No one knows exactly where this whimsical name originated, but similar recipes date back to ancient Rome and were popular in medieval and Renaissance Europe. Eighteenth and nineteenth century American cookbooks contain similar recipes for “jumbles.” Some suggest that the “snicker” portion of the name comes from the Dutch “snekrad” or the German “Schnecke,” both meaning a snail-like shape.)

Snickerdoodles

2 3/4 cups flour

2 teaspoons cream of tartar

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 1/2 cups sugar

1 cup butter, softened

2 eggs

2 teaspoons cinnamon

2 Tablespoons sugar

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Mix flour, cream of tartar, soda, and salt together. Combine 1 1/2 cups sugar with butter and blend. Add eggs and mix until smooth. Add dry ingredients and mix well to form a dough. Shape dough into 1 inch balls. Roll balls in mixture of the cinnamon and 2 Tablespoons sugar. Place on a lightly greased baking sheet and bake for 8 to 10 minutes or until light brown. Remove from oven and cool on rack. Makes 4 to 5 dozen.

 

Marinated Vegetable Salad

Summertime is a good time for grilling. This marinated salad keeps well for several days in the refrigerator, and is a delicious side for any grilled meat, chicken, or fish. Don’t let the long list of ingredients discourage trying it. There is little preparation involved other than some minor chopping and opening the variety of canned vegetables.

Marinated Vegetable Salad

Note:  all canned ingredients need to be drained before adding.

1 red onion, sliced

1 cup sun dried tomatoes, coarsely chopped

15 oz. can petite green peas

15 oz. can white corn

15 oz. can french style green beans

15 oz. can bean sprouts

12 oz. jar marinated artichoke hearts

10 oz. can bamboo shoots

10 oz. can sliced water chestnuts

12 oz. jar marinated roasted red peppers, coarsely chopped

3/4 cup pitted Kalamata olives

1 bottle Italian salad dressing, or make your own with oil, herbs, and vinegar.

Combine all ingredients except salad dressing in large bowl with lid. Toss well.

Add salad dressing and toss lightly to coat. Refrigerate several hours or overnight, tossing or turning bowl occasionally. Keeps well and is a great addition to potlucks.