Chicken Curry

My version of Chicken Curry is Javanese style, adapted from Foods Galore, a bilingual cookbook published by the American Women’s Association in Indonesia. I did not make my changes until after we returned to the U.S. after living there. I wrote my recipe on a card and although I vary the ingredients from time to time, I still use this basic recipe. When I decided to share it with you, I pulled my trusty cookbook out and looked at the original ingredients which included most of mine plus 1 cup of coconut milk from 1/2 coconut!  I am glad I have canned coconut milk now!  That recipe also created its own blend of curry powder  with turmeric, cumin, lemon grass, laos (ginger) and a red chile, crushed. I am happy to use one of Penzey’s many delicious blends of curry powder these days.

You might like to know that in Jakarta, Chicken Curry is called Ayam Kari Java. I first made this version for Joe, Ben and me on July 22, 1995.

Chicken Curry, Javanese Style

4 chicken breasts, cut into large chunks

3 Tablespoons olive oil

3-4 garlic cloves, chopped

1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped

2 Tablespoons fresh ginger, peeled and chopped

2 teaspoons red chili flakes

1 teaspoon salt or to taste

1/2 onion, chopped fine

1 Tablespoon curry powder of your choice, or to taste

1 can coconut milk (not cream of coconut)

Rub chicken with salt and brown oil until golden brown. Remove, add onion and garlic. When onion is beginning to brown, add ginger, cilantro, and chili flakes. Cook 1-2 minutes, add curry powder. Add coconut milk, blending well. Return chicken to sauce and cook until done. Serve over rice.

Chocolate Cake with Fudge Icing

 

Nora likes chocolate more than I do, if that is possible so we both looked forward to making this cake.  Some of my earliest memories are of being allowed to lick the bowl when Mother made a chocolate cake. She always made the icing in an iron skillet in the same way she made fudge, and as soon it was cool enough, I was allowed to have that spoon, too. Mother’s cake sometimes cracked when she put the 2nd layer on and I liked that piece best because the frosting soaked down into the cake through the crack. so when our cake cracked a bit near the edge, it was OK!  The recipes that follow were never written down for me, but I did find the cake recipe in my mother’s cookbook (given to her by her mother on Christmas, 1933.)  The fudge icing recipe is closest to the way I remember her making it. But instead of timing for a minute after the mixture boiled, she always cooked it until it was at soft-ball stage –  tested by dripping a few drops into a cup of cold water.

Chocolate Cake

1/2 cup shortening (we used Crisco)

1 cup sugar

1/2 teaspoon vanilla

2 eggs

1 1/2 cups flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1/8 teaspoon salt

1/2 cup milk

Cream sugar and shortening. Add vanilla and eggs; mix until well blended. Sift dry ingredients and add alternately with milk to the first mixture. Pour into two greased and floured cake pans, making the batter higher toward the edges so it rises more evenly. Bake in 375 degree oven for 39 minutes or until it tests done. Remove from pans, cool, and assemble by adding a layer of Fudge Icing between layers and frosting sides and top with the remainder.

Fudge Icing

2 cups granulated sugar

3 heaping tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder

⅔ cup whole milk

½ cup (1 stick)  butter, cut into cubes

1½ teaspoons vanilla

Mix sugar, cocoa powder, and milk together in a large saucepan.Cook over medium-high heat until large bubbles form and reaches a hard boil. Boil one minute at a hard boil. Remove from heat and add butter and vanilla.Beat with a wooden spoon until thick and smooth.Pour over cake. It will harden as it cools.

Peking Roast

Recently, I opened a cookbook and a clipping fluttered to the counter. I do not know how long it had been there, probably used as a book marker since I am guilty of picking up napkins, grocery lists, and whatever might be at hand to mark my place. I do this with other books as well. It sometimes results in a happy surprise like this. The newsprint was old and beginning to yellow, but I recognized the neat handwriting in the corner immediately. It was a note from my Mother:  “This sounds good- like your cooking.”  I do not remember ever trying the recipe although I often use coffee as part of the liquid in making pot roasts. I also brown a roast to very dark. But I have not marinated a roast in vinegar as this recipe suggests. So I decided to try it soon for 2 reasons. I was curious. But the main reason was Mother’s note. I have been looking through recipes lately, loving the gift of those recipe cards in her handwriting.

Peking Roast

3-5 lb. Beef Roast

garlic and onion slivers

1 cup vinegar

Water

Vegetable cooking oil

2 cups strong black coffee

2 cups water

salt and pepper

With a sharp knife, cut slits in roast and insert slivers of garlic and onion. Place the roast in a bowl and pour vinegar over it. Add enough water to cover the meat, then cover bowl and refrigerate 24 hours, basting occasionally. When ready to cook, drain liquid from meat and pat dry with a paper towel. Cover the bottom of a heavy pan or Dutch oven with cooking oil and heat. Sear the roast on all sides until very dark. Pour coffee over the roast, add water and cover. Simmer over low heat on top of the stove for 6 hours. Add salt and pepper after cooking. (If you wish to cook in a oven, bring the liquid to a boil on a stove burner, cover and place in 300 degree oven for 6 hours, adding liquid when needed.)

The only thing I changed from the original recipe was to bake it in a low oven for 6 hours instead of simmering on top of the stove. The results? A kitchen that smelled heavenly all afternoon,  roast beef that fell apart it was so tender, and delicious flavor. My mother died over 11 years ago, and long before that stopped clipping and sending recipes. But she is still giving  to me!

 

Broccoli Cheese Soup

2018 has brought with it a hard freeze for the South Texas Gulf Coast. Those who had gardens ready for harvest brought the bounty inside when they could. Friends who knew I liked to cook with the large outer leaves of cabbage brought me a huge beautiful head of cabbage, leaves intact. They also brought a large bunch of broccoli and a head of cauliflower.

For New Year’s Day, I made stuffed cabbage to go with our Black Eyed Peas!

The cauliflower will go into a mix of vegetables when I make chicken curry tomorrow!

And part of this lovely broccoli went into Cheese Broccoli Soup. I have posted a different recipe in the past, but this is our new favorite!

Cheese Broccoli Soup

 

1 large chopped onion

6 Tablespoons butter, divided (2 T for saute of onion, 4 T for making white sauce)

1/2 cup flour

4 cups half-and-half cream

4 cups chicken stock

1 lb fresh broccoli florets  (about 2 cups chopped)

1 cup carrot, diced

1./2  teaspoon nutmeg

16 ounces grated sharp cheddar cheese

salt and pepper to taste